Diocese Eisenstadt

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Transparency and openness
Since Eisenstadt’s bishop’s court construction in the 1950’s, no substantial building measures were undertaken. This lead to the fundamental need to adjust the building to changes concerning industrial law as well as changes in functional and structural requirements. The architectural expression of the opening of the clerical community is one of the central concerns of Diocese Eisenstadt.
Delivered pieces of furniture:
work tables Motion Quadratfuss Projekt and Quadratfuss Design, electronic lifting table, uni:tables, square tables Meet-Table, conference tables, table pin board light, wall pin board, rolling containers, sliding door cabinets, shelves, swivel chairs Sedus Match, Sedus Mr. 24, Viasit Scope, HAG H09, visitor chairs Sedus Netwin, lounge sofa La Cividina Holiday, glass partition walls, bivalve partition walls, cabinet walls

Construction:
Kp consulting group zt-gesmbh.

About the building:
The bishop’s court houses bureaus, the bishop’s flat, the newly designed chapel, staterooms, areas for cloister and offices including the ordinariate with vicar general, moderator and master of ceremonies, management of the press office and the bishop’s vicariates for Croatian and Hungarian ethnic groups. A guest room is located on the side wing’s top floor.
The challenge:

Since Eisenstadt’s bishop’s court construction in the 1950’s, no substantial building measures were undertaken. This lead to the fundamental need to adjust the building to changes concerning industrial law as well as changes in functional and structural requirements. The architectural expression of the opening of the clerical community is one of the central concerns of Diocese Eisenstadt
Implementation:
Glass partition walls with integrated cabinets were chosen to express the organisation’s contemporary culture. This creates ample transparency and openness, with the inner corridors being flooded with natural daylight. Bivalve constructions were employed in the so-called discretionary zones to increase noise protection. Visual, functional and timeless design were central to the furnishing of the building, with responsible handling of monetary resources being a priority.
Therefore, robust and cost-effective melamine surfaces were used in the standard offices, and a mixture of melamine and high-quality veneers from various timbers were employed in the representative offices. A particular challenge was to accommodate the combination of maximum storage and the desired number of work places in the historic building.

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